During Weeks 4 – 7 of the Global 2 Challenge we will be looking at the opportunities that blogging offers teaching and learning, under the four strategies of Connecting, Communicating, Collaborating and Learning Collectively. For further reading refer to the white paper: Understanding Virtual Pedagogies for Contemporary Teaching and Learning.

Re-thinking Transparency

rethink1

On Monday, we discussed at how the ease of online publishing, such as through blogging, changes learning. That students and classes are using blogging to showcase their learning and to reflect on their learning. That blogging enables students and classes to communicate not only with their wider school community but also with the global community.

So my question today is, how does blogging (and other online publishing) change what students publish?

Yesterday, we discussed how the publishing is no longer the end-point, that online publishing (through activities like blogging) results in responses and ongoing conversations with other web-users. And, if the nature of publishing has changed what does this mean for what is published?

When blogging provides students a wonderful opportunity to receive feedback and advice on their finished products, maybe students would produce better outcomes if their solicited online feedback and advice earlier in the process. Additionally, by blogging the learning process other learners will benefit from “seeing” the learning process rather than just the finished product.

George Siemens
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suggests that when students “make their learning transparent, they become teachers.” In
articulating changes in understanding over time, including retracting previously held beliefs based on new ideas
or experiences, the learner not only shares deep insight into the concept but also models effective personal sense
making. These are crucial 21st century skills for our students to have, the ability to “make sense” in a world where
knowledge is changing and new knowledge is created at a rapid pace

George Siemens suggests that when students “make their learning transparent, they become teachers.” In articulating changes in understanding over time, including retracting previously held beliefs based on new ideas or experiences, the learner not only shares deep insight into the concept but also models effective personal sense making. These are crucial 21st century skills for our students to have, the ability to “make sense” in a world where knowledge is changing and new knowledge is created at a rapid pace.

Some questions for further thinking and discussion:

What changes when students blog their whole learning process and not just finished products?

What changes when students blog their failures and not just their successes?

What changes when student blog their learning intentions?

Are their any reasons why students, teachers or parents would be hesitant for students to transparently blog their learning journey?

What are the benefits for learners to blog the whole learning process?

What are the benefits for learners to share their failures and well as their successes?


Please use the comment space below to respond to any of these questions.

When blogging a response to any of these question, please use the global 2 challenge tag #g2c11 or link to this post so that we can find your content.

Next in the Global 2 Challenge

Next Week, We’ll explore the Collaborating Strategy and the implications for blogging and the Global 2 Community.